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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Bompensiero Frank: Frank "the Bomp"


Bompensiero Frank:  Frank "the Bomp" Bompensiero was born in Milwaukee in 1905 and eventually made his way west to California. In 1937, Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel, representing the national syndicate let it be known that West Coast gamblers would have to split their profits down the middle with him. One gambler who held out was Lew Brunemann, who had aspirations of controlling all the gambling in southern California. In July 1937, Bompensiero and one of his men found Brunemann strolling along Redondo Beach. The mobsters walked up behind him and put three slugs in his back, Brunemann lived. A while later, on October 25, Brunemann was having his dinners at the Roost CafĂ©, in Redondo Beach restaurant, with one of his nurses.  Bompensiero and his gunman Leo "Lips" Moceri, a former member of Detroit’s Purple Gang. 
Moceri said later "I’ve got a forty-five automatic and the place’s packed with people. I walk right up to his table and start pumping lead. Believe me, that sonovabitch’s going to be dead for sure this time. "Bomp’s supposed to be by the door, watching my back to make sure nobody jumps me. I turn around and I see this football player … coming at me. Bomp’s nowhere in sight. Now I’m either going to clip this (guy) or he’s going to knock me on my ass. So I blast him and run out, and there’s Bomp already in the fucking car … waiting for me. That guy showed me his color. If you ever work with Bomp, get him out in front of you instead of behind you."    The police arrested the wrong man for the Brunemann murder.
On February 28, 1938, Moceri and Bompensiero kidnapped Phil Galuzo off a Los Angeles street. Bompensiero gave Galuzo a vicious beating and then shot him six times.  After that Bompensiero left the west coast and hid out in Tampa under the protection by the Trafficante Family. When he returned to Los Angeles in June 1941, the murder charges against him were dropped due to lack of evidence.
After Bugsy Siegel’s murder in June of 1947, Los Angeles Mafia boss Jack Dragna attempted to take over the local gambling operations. Almost everyone fell into place except Mickey Cohen, one of Siegel’s top men who was heavily into narcotics.  On Aug. 18, 1948, Jimmy Fratianno and his family visited Cohen’s haberdashery shop to pick up tickets to the musical “Annie Get Your Gun.”Outside a Mafia hit squad was waiting. Inside, Fratianno shook Cohen’s hand  and left. As soon as Fratianno was gone, Cohen, who had a clean fetish,  retreated to a bathroom to wash his hands.  Once outside, Fratianno signaled Frank DeSimone and Bompensiero and three other men pulled up. Bompensiero, carry a shotgun, shot Cohen’s bodyguard Hooky Rothman in the face.
Two other Cohen associates inside the store, Al Snyder and Jimmy Rist, were slightly wounded. Cohen escaped.  Moceri later said "It was Bomp’s contract, and he blew it. Listen, (the others) didn’t know Mickey from a lamppost, but Bomp did. They go in there and blast away at Al Snyder thinking he’s Mickey. Then they shoot him in the arm, for Christ’s sake. While this going on, Mickey’s in the shitcan, standing on top of the sink. They didn’t pump one slug through that door. Like a bunch of cowboys, they panicked and ran out instead of finishing the job."
In the very early 1950s, Jack Dragna appointed Bompensiero boss of the San Diego territory. Bompensiero kept office at nightclub they owned together, the Gold Rail.  In the early 1950s, Fratianno met with Bompensiero to discuss plans to murder Frank Borgia, an ex-bootlegger still tied to Dragna. Gaspare Matranga was trying to extort money from Borgia who lodged a complaint with Dragna. Of course Dragna was in on the shakedown, otherwise it never would have happened in the first place.  When Borgia wouldn’t pay, Dragna ordered Bompensiero to murder Borgia. Anthony Mirabile brought Borgia to Joe Adamo’s house. Once inside Mirabile grabbed Borgia while Bompensiero and Fratianno pulled a rope around Borgia’s throat and pulled from opposite ends, choking him to death.
In 1955, Bompensiero was convicted on three counts of bribery and was sentenced to three-to-14 years in San Quentin. He served five. Fratianno was transferred San Quentin as well and Bompensiero made the mistake of telling him that he killed "Red" Sagunda, an ex-Cleveland thug who was operating in San Diego. In the meantime, Jack Dragna died in 1957 and was succeeded by lawyer-turned-mobster Frank DeSimone who drove the LA family into the ground. When he died in 1968, the group was taken over by Nick Licata, would proved to be even a weaker boss then DeSimone.
Bompensiero despised Johnny Roselli, the west coast representative of the Chicago mob in Los Angeles and Las Vegas, "These two guys (from Detroit) were having a feud and they went to see Joe Zerilli, each wanting the other guy clipped. So Mike Polizzi came to see me and this was strictly between us, nothing to do with the L. A. family. They tell me who they want clipped but I’ve got to do the job alone.  As it happens I know the guy. So one night I see him at a party and I pull him aside. I says, ‘Look here, you’ve been having this problem and the old man’s given me the contract. I’m going to clip this guy but I’m going to need your help.’ Now this guy’s all happy, see, and I tell him I’ve got a bad back and I need him to dig the hole. We go out to this fucking place I’ve picked out ahead of time and this guy starts digging the fucking hole. Works like a sonovabitch, this guy, sweating bullets.  So finally he says, ‘How’s that? Deep enough.’ I’m sitting down, resting, so I get up and I says, ‘It’s perfect.’ He starts climbing out of the hole and I shoot the cocksucker in the back of the fucking head. Back down he goes in the hole and I fill it in."
According to Bompensiero, he was supposed to receive a percentage of the profits from the Frontier Casino in Las Vegas as compensation for the hit. When Detroit reneged, Bompensiero went to see Johnny Roselli to make things right.  Roselli ended up with a percentage of the casinos gift shop. Bompensiero never forgot the slight or forgave Roselli.
In 1967, Bompensiero became an informant for the FBI. In December of 1967 Johnny Roselli was charged with fleecing members of the Beverly Hills Friars Club out of $400,000 in rigged gin-rummy games. Seach, a member of the gang, who was granted immunity as a government witness if he testified against Roselli. Roselli learned about the deal and asked Fratianno to find Seach and kill him. He never did because Bompensiero notified the FBI and Seach was moved out to Hawaii.
In the early 1970s, Bompensiero did business with Anthony "Tony the Ant" Spilotro, the Chicago mob’s new overseer in Las Vegas but otherwise continued to be a malcontent in the LA operation. When Nick Licata died in 1974, Dominic Brooklier took over the Los Angeles Mob and a year later, put out a contract on Bompensiero but Mob gunmen couldn’t track him down. When Brooklier went to prison, Louis Tom Dragna, the nephew of Jack and the acting family boss announced that he was making Bompensiero Consigliere of the Los Angeles Mafia. It was little more than a trick to drag Bompensiero out into the open. They would wait to kill him.
The FBI learned that Fratianno was getting into the pornography business so the agency set up a dummy company called Forex and had Bompensiero tell Fratianno about the company. Several days later, Fratianno learned that Forex was an FBI sting operation.

Fratianno called Bompensiero and demanded to know where he had learned about Forex and why he wanted the outfit to get involved. Bompensiero lied and said that the information from a local pornography storeowner. When Fratianno told Bompensiero to bring the store owner to him, Bompensiero said that the owner had been killed several days before.  They knew he was lying. On February 10, 1977, the 71-year old Bompensiero he was shot and killed by Thomas Ricciardi. Jimmy Fratianno eventually became an FBI informant and would later be forced into the Witness Protection Program. Suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, died in his sleep at the age of 79 in June of 1993.

Barzotinni, Dante:

Barzotinni, Dante: AKA Tino Barzie. Frank Sinatra Jr.'s manager. He purchased $50,000 worth of boasted airline tickets from gangster Henry Hill to fly Sinatra Jr. and a group of eight friends around the country. Barzie was caught and convicted. 

Angelini Donald AKA The Wizard of Odds

Angelini Donald AKA The Wizard of Odds, Born 1926. Died December 8 2000 Correctly, Angelini was viewed by authorities as one of the top money makers in the syndicate history. He and Dominic Cortina reigned as gambling czars over a $20 million per-year sports betting empire. Angelini scoffed at the government's figures, but government agents insisted their numbers may even have been conservative. He did it by setting nearly unbeatable spreads on sporting events and controlled the odds for football, baseball and hockey games.
Bill Kaplan, who had been around the gambling world since the days of Al Capone, was one of the last independent gamblers in the city in the 1960s. He had built up a lucrative racing and handicapping service on Clark Street that supplied odds to bookmakers all over the world in the years before the nation's scattered wire services were legislated out of existence by the government and supplanted by the Las Vegas casinos. One day, "Milwaukee Phil" Alderisio's attempt to squeeze him out of business. It was just a matter of time before Alderisio grew tired of asking and simply killed Kaplan and Kaplan knew it. Kaplan went to mob lawyer George Bieber  and Mike Brodkin and cut a deal in which he would hand over 50% of his business in so long as the somber and deadly Alderisio stayed away from him and his business. It was a lucrative offer and the Outfit sent in the smooth, educated Don Angelini as the intermediary
Eventually, Angelini was selected as the Chicago family's replacement for Tony Spilotro out in Las Vegas, but by then, the mobs interest and influence had floundered. Cops and crooks alike considered the refined and urbane Angelini to be a cut above the rest. Unlike the other representatives sent out to Las Vegas by the mob, Tony Spilotro, Marshal Caifano or Johnny Roselli, Angelina was a thinking man, a true gambler who never intimidated or killed anyone. Angelini, like Spilotro and Caifano, was barred from entering Las Vegas casinos by the state of Nevada and by the state of Illinois.
Splitting his time between Las Vegas, the West Coast and Chicago, in November of 1989, Dominic Cortina (Born 1929) and Angelini, pled guilty to charges that they ran a multimillion dollar betting empire that took wagers on college and professional football, basketball and baseball games. (Others involved in the case included Joseph Rosengard, Joseph Spadavecchio Leonard Zullo, Raymond Tominello, Richard Catezone, Louis Parilli, and his brother, Charles Parilli) The group took in bets of up to $188,000 a day at 16 different locations in Chicago, Oak Park and Bensenville Illinois.
Cortina organized the ring, supervised the booking offices, gave large bettors telephone numbers to place their bets, and paid out and collected winning and losing wagers from special gamblers, according to the charges. Angelini provided the point spread, known as "the line," and took bets from gamblers outside the Chicago area. In one instance, Angelini took bets totaling $16,000 from one out-of-state bettor on the outcome of football games being played by Boston College, Clemson, Nebraska, Mississippi, Texas and Southern California.
Joey Auippa, greedy and thoughtless, demanded that Angelini and his boss Dom Cortina to explore all avenues outside of Las Vegas in an effort to determine new "skimming possibilities." So Angelini found, eventually, the Rincon Indian reservation in California. In all likelihood, the Outfit would have passed on the Rincon reservation deal because it was such a disorganized mess, filled with tribal backbiting and politics. However, Angelini and DiFronzo came to the attention of the West Coast FBI after they made several messy collections out west. The Bureau taped their phones and gained information, most of it from the financier Richard Silberman who was involved with Angelini.
The plan was to finance the tribe's venture into gambling, take over the operations, skim money from the casinos as well as use it to launder money from narcotics sales. Dom Angelini placed Chris Petti, the outfit's man in San Diego, in charge of the takeover. Petti, in turn, was to deal directly with Angelini's brother-in-law, Michael Caracci, a soldier in the DiFronzo crew. The two hoods fought endlessly and complained about each other to Chicago through the back channels.  Caracci contacted Petti at the same San Diego pay phone they had been using for years, which, unknown to them the FBI had tapped years before in a different case. The FBI sent in an undercover agent named Peter Carmassi, who presented himself as a money launderer for a Columbian drug cartel. The Chicago mob, in the meantime, had decided that Rincon was a bust and wouldn’t put any money into it. However, they would allow Angelini and Petti to stay involved if they could find an outside source to finance the plan. Carmassi, the FBI agent, showed an interest.  In several tape recorded and filmed meetings with undercover agent Carmassi, Petti laid out the entire scam to take over the Rincon reservation gambling concession.
On January 9, 1992, the government indicted Petti, DiFronzo, Carlisi and the reservation's lawyer, on 15 counts of criminal conspiracy. DiFronzo and Angelini were convicted and got a 37-month sentence, with fines approaching one million dollars. Carlisi, DiFronzo and Angelini would all go to prison in 1993 on federal racketeering charges. 

Carlisi was eventually released from the case but Angelini and DiFronzo were convicted and each received 37 months for their part in the scheme. Both sentences were later reduced on appeal.  Angelini died  at age after fighting cancer for years. The Outfit never replaced Angelini out west and the position of Representato to Las Vegas is, by all accounts, no more.

Adamo, Girolamo: AKA Mo-Mo

*****
Adamo, Girolamo: AKA Mo-Mo 4134 Lymer Drive in San Diageo. When, in 1955, Los Angeles Police Department arrested west coast hood Jack Dragna and his right hand man Girolamo “Mo-Mo” Adamo, they found a confidential address book that contained the addresses and names, and private telephone numbers, of some of the leading underworld mobsters  in the Nation. Among the names contained in this book was that of Tony Accardo, together with his residence address in River Forest, Ill. The book also contained the name of Joe Batters, which is the name frequently used by Accardo.

 On August 4, 1967, according to police reports, Attorney Frank DeSimone (7838 Adoree Street Downey Calf) became the boss of the Los Angeles Family following the death of Jack Dragna in February 1956. Reportedly, in 1956 DeSimone raped Girolamo’s wife, Marie, then 44, in front of Girolamo, who was 60 years old at the time. Several days later on June 18, Girolamo beat this wife in their rented beach house, struck in the head with an empty wine bottle and then shot her in the neck with a .32 and then committed suicide. The wife survived (She ran to a neighbor’s house for safety and married hoodlum Frank Bompensiero. 

The view outside my bedroom window, spring is finally arriving




Cancer

My brother Danny allowed me take these photos of his last months on earth at the Bethesda Naval Hospital. I told him I would never show them to anyone and probably destroy them and he said “No, show them. If it keeps one kid from smoking, it’s worth it”

Danny served 27 years in the military before succumbing to throat cancer in October of 2015. He smoked two packs of cigarettes a day for 45 of his 58 years.  

He put up a noble fight, I must say, no small thing considering the toll cancer takes on those that it steals and he fought back by never losing his sense of humor. When cancer reduced him to less than a hundred pounds. I came into his room one day and he was reading the newspaper want ads.

“I’m considering selling grave sites” he said “or maybe Jenny Craig modeling, who ever makes the best offer"

Maybe because he came from a time and place where a man took his pain and dealt with it or maybe because or was just one of the last true tough guys, I never heard him complain about having cancer or about what a bad break it was or ask “Why me?”

As the months went by and the pain increased and things became worse and time ran out he grew closer to his faith and wondered aloud if God would hold it against him that he only came back to the church when he was in trouble. I told him God was lucky that he came back at all. I wish I had said something better than that but it made him feel better and I think God understand a Celts bravado.