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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Good words to have



Nemesis
 (NEM-uh-suhs)
1. A formidable opponent or an archenemy. 2. A source of harm or ruin. 3. Retributive justice. In Greek mythology, Nemesis was the goddess of vengeance. From Greek nemesis (retribution), from nemein (to allot). Ultimately from the Indo-European root nem- (to assign or take), which also gave us number, numb, astronomy,renumerate, and anomie.
In the ancient Greek religion, Nemesis also called Rhamnousia/ Rhamnusia ("the goddess of Rhamnous") was the goddess who enacted retribution against those who succumb to hubris (arrogance before the gods). Another name was Adrasteia/ Adrestia, meaning "the inescapable". Her Roman name/ counterpart is Invidia.
The name Nemesis is related to the Greek word νέμειν némein, meaning "to give what is due", from Proto-Indo-European nem- "distribute".
Divine retribution is a major theme in the Hellenic world view, providing the unifying theme of the tragedies of Sophocles and many other literary works.
Nemesis appears in a still more concrete form in a fragment of the epic Cypria. She is implacable justice: that of Zeus in the Olympian scheme of things, although it is clear she existed prior to him, as her images look similar to several other goddesses, such as Cybele, Rhea, Demeter, and Artemis.
As the "Goddess of Rhamnous", Nemesis was honored and placated in an archaic sanctuary in the isolated district of Rhamnous, in northeastern Attica. There she was a daughter of Oceanus, the primeval river-ocean that encircles the world. Pausanias noted her iconic statue there.  She is portrayed as a winged goddess wielding a whip or a dagger.
The word Nemesis originally meant the distributor of fortune, neither good nor bad, simply in due proportion to each according to what was deserved.[citation needed] Later, nemesis came to suggest the resentment caused by any disturbance of this right proportion, the sense of justice that could not allow it to pass unpunished



Myrmidon
(MUHR-mi-dahn, -duhn) 
One who unquestioningly follows orders. In Greek mythology, the Myrmidons were led by Achilles in the Trojan War. The name is possibly from Greek myrmex (ant). In a version of the story, Zeus created Myrmidons from ants.

The Achilleis (after the Ancient Greek χιλληΐς, Achillēis, pronounced [akʰillɛːís]) is a lost trilogy by the Athenian dramatist Aeschylus. The three plays that make up the Achilleis exist today only in fragments, but aspects of their overall content can be reconstructed with reasonable certainty. 








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