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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Eli, my dog, in the car



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Don't you just want to see the entire world?


Tiberius


Portrait of Tiberius. Circa 30 AD. Marble.


Tiberius:  November 16  42 BC – March 16 37 AD) was a Roman emperor from 14 AD to 37 AD. Born Tiberius Claudius Nero, a Claudian, Tiberius was the son of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Livia Drusilla. His mother divorced Nero and married Octavian, later known as Augustus, in 39 BC, making him a step-son of Octavian.

Tiberius would later marry Augustus' daughter (from his marriage to Scribonia), Julia the Elder, and even later be adopted by Augustus, by which act he officially became a Julian, bearing the name Tiberius Julius Caesar. The subsequent emperors after Tiberius would continue this blended dynasty of both families for the following thirty years; historians have named it the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

In relations to the other emperors of this dynasty, Tiberius was the stepson of Augustus, grand-uncle of Caligula, paternal uncle of Claudius, and great-grand uncle of Nero. His 22-and-a-half-year reign would be the longest after Augustus's until Antoninus Pius, who surpassed his reign by a few months in 161.

Tiberius was one of the greatest Roman generals; his conquest of Pannonia, Dalmatia, Raetia, and temporarily, parts of Germania, laid the foundations for the northern frontier. But he came to be remembered as a dark, reclusive, and sombre ruler who never really desired to be emperor; Pliny the Elder called him tristissimus hominum, "the gloomiest of men."

After the death of Tiberius’ son Drusus Julius Caesar in 23 AD, he became more reclusive and aloof. In 26 AD Tiberius removed himself from Rome and left administration largely in the hands of his unscrupulous Praetorian prefects Lucius Aelius Sejanus and Quintus Naevius Sutorius Macro.

Caligula, Tiberius' grand-nephew and adopted grandson, succeeded Tiberius upon his death.

Writers hint


“What people are ashamed of usually makes a good story.”F. Scott Fitzgerald


Remember when you used to think teachers were smart people?





Great Valley Charter School in Modesto, California is accusing a five-year-old of making terrorist threats

The parents of a 5-year-old boy in Modesto are upset their son was suspended for a day after refusing to take off his backpack.
Jackson Riley had told his teacher there was a bomb inside his backpack.
Jackson's school, Great Valley Charter School, sent his parents a letter saying he was suspended for his intent to "threaten, intimidate or harass others."
School administrators later changed the letter to apply to a school code saying he made terrorist threats, but that code only applies to students in the fourth through 12th grades.
Jackson's parents argue he's just 5 years old and was just playing around. They say they don't want anything on their child's file saying he was suspended for making terrorist threats.
The school declined to comment


California professor under fire for 'white privilege' quiz

A San Diego State University professor is under fire after he gave students an extra credit quiz to determine their level of “white privilege.”
Sociology professor Dae Elliott’s “White Privilege Checklist” included 20 questions in hopes that students can see that “racial privilege is one form of privilege,” The College Fix reports. The assignment asked students to check off whether statements apply to them. Elliott is the President South Bay Lesbian Alliance
“I can be late to a meeting without having the lateness reflect on my race,” one statement on the quiz said. “I can enroll in a class at college and be sure that the majority of my professors will be of my race,” said another.
The end of the quiz asked students to define any other types of privileges they may think they have. Those with the highest number of checkmarks are determined to have the most privilege. 


The answer is YES


Has asset forfeiture gone too far? 

By Doug McKelway

Customs seized Gerardo Serrano's truck because he had a handful of legally obtained bullets in his possession; Doug McKelway has the story for 'Special Report'
WASHINGTON –  Two years ago, Gerardo Serano – an American citizen, Kentucky farmer and a one-time GOP Kentucky statehouse candidate – was driving his brand new, $60,000 Ford F-250 pick-up truck to visit relatives in Mexico, snapping pictures along the way, when Customs and Border Patrol agents halted him at the border, demanded his cell phone, and asked him why he was taking pictures.
"I just wanted the opening of the bridge. I was gonna take the opening of the bridge, the entrance of the bridge. That’s all I wanted to do," Serano told Fox News.
As a self-proclaimed student of the Constitution, Serano said he knew his rights, and protested to Customs and Border Patrol agents vehemently when they asked him to unlock his phone.
"You need a warrant for that," he says he told them. They searched his truck and found five bullets in a magazine clip that Serano, a Kentucky concealed carry permit holder, forgot to remove before leaving his home.
"We got you," he says border agents told him. He was detained, but never arrested, nor charged, nor tried, nor convicted. However, agents did seize his prized new truck. Two years since its seizure, they have yet to give it back.
Serano is still making monthly payments of $673 on the truck as well as paying for its insurance and Kentucky license fees.
His attorneys at the Institute for Justice say Customs and Border Patrol has told them the truck was subject to the government's Civil Asset Forfeiture program because it was used to "transport munitions of war." 
The Civil Asset Forfeiture program has its roots in English law that American colonists rebelled against. Their rebellion was ultimately codified in the Fourth Amendment, which reads, in part: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated..."
Despite that unambiguous language, civil asset forfeiture was revived in the 1930s Prohibition era against bootleggers and mobsters. It was revived again in the 1980s war on drugs and continues to this day.
"It’s absolutely astonishing that civil forfeiture is a policy that we have in this country,” said Clark Neily of the Cato Institute. “It is totally unjust, unfair, and I think it's unconstitutional."
Sen. Rand Paul, (R-KY) agrees. "There are instances of people, young people, getting some money and saying, ‘I'm moving to California from Boston.’ They're stopping in some small town in Nevada, and they have a thousand bucks their dad gave them to get started,” Paul said. “And the police just take it and say: ‘You prove to us that this isn't drug money.’"
Gerardo Serrano's truck was seized over five bullets, which he says were lawfully his.  (Institute for Justice)
Morgan Wright, a senior fellow at the Center for Digital Government, spent 20 years as a police officer and detective in Kansas. He cites the benefits of civil asset forfeiture.
"We seized everything from cars to houses to money to jewelry to you name it," he said. "One of the cash seizures I had, had plans for a methamphetamine laboratory. They had documented intelligence that they had people working in these operations, people selling cocaine - cartel activity out of Mexico."
Wright acknowledges asset forfeiture may have gone too far.
"One of the worst things you can do in law enforcement is to take a good tool and abuse it," Wright said. "So that restrictive regulations come down on it, and it's taken away from everybody."
Many contend the program's abuses outweigh its benefits. Congressional critics were outraged, when, this summer, Attorney General Jeff Sessions ended Obama-era restrictions that blocked forfeiture without a warrant or criminal charges.
In a rare show of bipartisanship, conservative House Republicans joined liberal Democrats this month in rolling back Sessions’ undoing of the Obama-era reforms. During floor debate, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher said: "Asset forfeiture is a crime against the American people committed by their own government."
"The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution exists to protect the citizens of this country from being deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law. In practice and in principle, adoptive forfeiture is a violation of that Fourth Amendment," she said
The Senate is also poised to act.
"We have a free-standing bill that says the government shouldn't take peoples’ property without a conviction, that the burden is on the government that you actually agreed to commit a crime," Sen. Paul told Fox News.
"We also will look at, as the funding bills come through in the House, if they do bring up the Appropriation Bill for the Department of Justice, I will attach that language to it," he added.
Many say what's needed is a Supreme Court test case. It may get one.
Serano, represented by the Institute for Justice, is suing Customs to get his truck back and to end the policy of civil forfeiture once and for all. Justice Clarence Thomas has publicly said the high court needs a good case that address the problems of civil asset forfeiture.


I adore B&W photos from film: Emil Otto Hoppé



Emil Otto Hoppé (April 14 1878 – December 91972) was a German-born British portrait, travel, and topographic photographer active between 1907 and 1945. Born to a wealthy family in Munich, he moved to London in 1900 to train as a financier, but took up photography and rapidly achieved great success.
Rarely in the history of the medium has a photographer been so famous in his own lifetime among the general public. He was as famous as his sitters. It is difficult to think of a prominent name in the fields of politics, art, literature, and the theatre who did not pose for his camera."

Although Hoppé was one of the most important photographic artists of his era and highly celebrated in his time, in 1954, at the age of 76, he sold his body of photographic work to a commercial London picture archive, the Mansell Collection. In the collection, the work was filed by subject in with millions of other stock pictures and no longer accessible by author. Almost all of Hoppé's photographic work—that which gained him the reputation as Britain's most influential international photographer between 1907 and 1939—was accidentally obscured from photo-historians and from photo-history itself. It remained in the collection for over thirty years after Hoppé's death, and was not fully accessible to the public until the collection closed down and was acquired by new owners in the United States.
In 1994 photographic art curator Graham Howe retrieved Hoppé's photographic work from the picture library and rejoined it with the Hoppé family archive of photographs and biographical documents. This was the first time since 1954 that the complete E.O. Hoppé Collection was gathered together. Many years were spent in cataloguing, conservation, and research of the recovered work.





They’re standing in a parking lot....

 “They’re standing in a parking lot and they just start talking to each other,” Kennedy aide Peter Edelman remembers. “There starts to be this circle of people around them, and then it’s two deep and three deep. … It just took a five-minute conversation and they were friends for life.” This Kennedy brother related to the poor – and to migrants in particular – the way the novelist John Steinbeck had in “The Grapes of Wrath,” trying to see the world through their eyes. 
“Bobby crossed a line no other American politician in my lifetime has ever crossed … of personal feeling and intensity and identifying with people who hurt, people who are casualties.’ I don’t see anybody since Robert Kennedy who has that depth of psychic communication and empathy with life’s losers.“  - Cesar Chavez

Bobby with United Farm workers Leader Cesar Chavez as he ends a fast designed to draw attention to the poor working conditions of Migrants in California, 1968.





Travel and tell no one.


“Travel and tell no one. Live a true love story and tell no one. Live happily and tell no one. People ruin beautiful things.” Khalil Gibran



Paraprosdokians




First time I heard about paraprosdokians, I liked them. Paraprosdokians are figures of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected and is frequently humorous. (Winston Churchill loved them).

1. Where there's a will, I want to be in it.

2. The last thing I want to do is hurt you ...  but it's still on my list.

3. Since light travels faster than sound, some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

4. If I agreed with you, we'd both be wrong.

5. We never really grow up -- we only learn how to act in public.

6. War does not determine who is right, only who is left.

7 Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
8. To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism. To steal from many is research.

9. I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

10. In filling out an application, where it says, "In case of
emergency, notify..." I answered "a doctor."

11. Women will never be equal to men until they can walk down the street with a bald head and a beer gut, and still think they are sexy.

12. You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

13. I used to be indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

14 To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target.

15. Going to church doesn't make you a Christian, any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.

16. You're never too old to learn something stupid.


17. I'm supposed to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder for me to find one now.


















“I can’t explain what I mean.

  
“I can’t explain what I mean. And even if I could, I’m not sure I’d feel like it.”    J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye