Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Following Fitzgerald: The Iceberg: A Story by Zelda Fitzgerald

Following Fitzgerald: The Iceberg: A Story by Zelda Fitzgerald: In 1918, Zelda Sayre, later Zelda Fitzgerald, won a prize for this story, which she published in the Sidney Lanier High School Literary...

Photographs we've taken: Boston

Photographs we've taken: Boston: ...

Vivacious


Vivacious means "full of life," it can be traced back to the Latin verb "vivere," meaning "to live." The word was created around the mid-17th century using the Latin adjective "vivax," meaning "long-lived, vigorous, or high-spirited." Other descendants of "vivere" in English include "survive," "revive," and "victual"—all of which came to life during the 15th century—and "vivid" and "convivial," both of which surfaced around the same time as "vivacious." Somewhat surprisingly, the word "live" is not related; it comes to us from the Old English word "libban."

twas the night


I love this stuff

Midriff.  The "riff" in "midriff" comes from Old English "hrif" ("belly, womb"). "Hrif" is akin to Old High German "href" ("womb") and probably also to Latin "corpus" ("body").

Your success and happiness lies in you.

Your success and happiness lies in you. Resolve to keep happy, and your joy and you shall form an invincible host against difficulties. Helen Keller.



 

Me and Bart and Mary










Happiness is a long stick...com'm everybody..Hap-i-ness is a long stick mamma, yes it is....


Mary's birthday at Hidden Creek CC




We bought a painting...we already had the dog


Interesting story from Matt Tuohy in England




Manure.... An interesting fact

In the 16th and 17th centuries, everything had to be transported by ship and it was also before the invention of commercial fertilizers, so large shipments of manure were quite common.

It was shipped dry, because in dry form it weighed a lot less than when wet, but once water (at sea) hit it, not only did it become heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a by-product is methane gas of course. As the stuff was stored below decks in bundles you can see what could (and did) happen. Methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern, BOOOOM!

Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was determined just what was happening.

After that, the bundles of manure were always stamped with the instruction ' Stow high in transit ' on them, which meant for the sailors to stow it high enough off the lower decks so that any water that came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the production of methane.

Thus evolved the term ' S.H.I.T ' , (Stow High In Transit) which has come down through the centuries and is in use to this very day. 

Photo I snapped in Boston


When you grow up


Karma


The LLR: Having a problem with manuscript rejections? Read ...

The LLR: Having a problem with manuscript rejections? Read ...:   Are some people destined for success, or is the whole idea of destiny a myth, a comforting tale that we tell ourselves? When artists or...

powerful your thoughts

If you realized how powerful your thoughts are, you would never think a negative thought. PeacePilgrim


The LLR: Wanda Coleman dies at 67; L.A.'s unofficial poet l...

The LLR: Wanda Coleman dies at 67; L.A.'s unofficial poet l...: Wanda Coleman, a provocative Los Angeles poet who wrote lyrically and often angrily about the trials of life in her native metropolis...

The LLR: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

The LLR: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge: "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" or "A Dead Mans Dream" is a short story by American author Ambrose Bierce (184...
“Authority has every reason to fear the skeptic, for authority can rarely survive in the face of doubt.” Robert Lindner

The LLR: Sporadic

The LLR: Sporadic: "Sporadic" comes from Medieval Latin "sporadicus," which is itself derived from Greek "sporadēn," meaning ...

The LLR: Rube

The LLR: Rube: The term originated in the 19th century when circuses were rowdy affairs and "Hey Rube" was the rallying cry to call all circus...

A big blog of Irish Literature: Eimear McBride wins £10,000 Goldsmiths prize for l...

A big blog of Irish Literature: Eimear McBride wins £10,000 Goldsmiths prize for l...: Liz Bury McBride said there was "a long time when I thought I would never have this book published, and I felt quite depressed...

A big blog of Irish Literature: Dublin Book Festival kicks off

A big blog of Irish Literature: Dublin Book Festival kicks off: Louise Kelly – 14 November 2013 Literary lovers and ambitious authors welcome the return of Dublin’s largest book festival t...

Charles Dickens: On this day in history in 1859, Charles Dickens pu...

Charles Dickens: On this day in history in 1859, Charles Dickens pu...: On this day in history in 1859, Charles Dickens published the final installment of A Tale of Two Cities. “It is a far, far better thing t...

The LLR: A Story about the Body by Robert Hass

The LLR: A Story about the Body by Robert Hass: The young composer, working that summer at an artist's colony, had watched her for a week. She was Japanese, a painter, almost sixty, ...

The LLR: "The Appointment in Samarra"

The LLR: "The Appointment in Samarra": "The Appointment in Samarra" (as retold by W. Somerset Maugham [1933]) The speaker is Death There was a merchant in Bag...

The LLR: "Cargoes"

The LLR: "Cargoes": "Cargoes" by John Masefield Cargoes Quinquireme of Nineveh from distant Ophir, Rowing home to haven in sunny Palestine,...

The LLR: The Distance of the Moon by Italo Calvino

The LLR: The Distance of the Moon by Italo Calvino: At one time, according to Sir George H. Darwin, the Moon was very close to the Earth. Then the tides gradually pushed her far away: the tid...

The LLR: Kindling by Raymond Carver

The LLR: Kindling by Raymond Carver:     It was the middle of August and Myers was between lives. The only thing different about this time from the other times was that this t...

enormity

enormity \ih-NOR-muh-tee\
 noun.
 1:        great wickedness
 2:        an outrageous or immoral act or offense
 3 :       very large size
 4 :       the quality of great impact or importance



Although "enormity" has been used since the late 1700s to denote large size, this usage continues to be disparaged by various language commentators who argue that "enormity" should be reserved for senses related to "great wickedness." It is "enormousness," they insist (a hefty and considerably less common word), that should be used in reference to great size, despite the fact that, like "enormity," it too originally was used to denote wickedness or divergence from accepted moral standards. For better or worse, this proscription has been widely ignored by many English speakers, including professional writers. However one chooses to use them, "enormity" and "enormous" can both be traced back to the Latin "enormis," from the prefix "e-" ("out of") and "norma" ("rule," "pattern," or "carpenter's square").


We are what our thoughts have made us

We are what our thoughts have made us; so take care about what you think. Words are secondary. Thoughts live; they travel far.  Swami Vivekananda


Distraction


A good laugh


Great hunters


editing, rather than of authorship

We are the products of editing, rather than of authorship.  George Wald.



I have been sitting at this desk for hours

I have been sitting at this desk for hours, staring into the darkened shelves of books. I love their presence, the way they honor the wood they rest upon. Richard Brautigan.


Karma Repair Kit



1.Get enough food to eat,
and eat it.


2.Find a place to sleep where it is quiet,
and sleep there.


3.Reduce intellectual and emotional noise
until you arrive at the silence of yourself,
and listen to it.
                                                
                                                       4.



― Richard Brautigan